Construction Letter

Radius letters. Pardon Our Dust letters. Neighborhood postcards. We’re in the neighborhood letters….

Whatever you want to call them, construction letters are a great way to reach out with your marketing without having to spend time “kissing babies.”

Once you get your system down, your construction letter can become almost fully automated.

But, if you don’t have a lot of experience in this area, how do you get started?

Well let me begin by saying there are two things that are more important than everything else when you’re putting together a construction letter as a direct mail piece.

  1. The List
  2. The Copy

The List

It may seem obvious to you, but plenty of construction companies spend more time worrying about pictures and ads to put on their mailings than they do focusing on drilling down a highly targeted list.

And your list will make all the difference.

You can take the simple route and just target a neighborhood where you’ve had multiple successful projects in the past. But I would suggest you dig deeper than that.

For example, try looking at some more specific details of your past clients. What do they have in common?

 

 

You can check the public data to see if perhaps most of your past clients had recently moved in to their homes before they called you. This data is available if you wanted to target recent move-ins.

Or perhaps a good portion of your past clients were in a certain range of income level. This type of information is available from list brokers.

Brainstorm about how you can find the most targeted list before you send out your letter.

Next up?

The Copy

Copywriting skills are some of the most important skills you can learn to advance your marketing.

When writing a construction letter it’s important to think about using persuasive copy to influence your prospect to act.

Direct response methods work well here.

Put simply, this means you need to have a unique, valuable offer, and a call to action.

The biggest mistake most beginners make when writing a construction letter is to simply spend all their white space on the page writing about themselves and their company. This is not productive when it comes to getting a response from a mailing.

You must take the time to get into the mind of your prospect. Figure out what she looks for, what worries her, what’s most important to her.

One method is called “Problem – Agitate – Solve”.

Hone in on your prospect’s problem, use descriptive words to agitate and paint a picture of life with this problem, then position yourself as the solution.

This formula will give you a good start for ad copy that converts prospects into buyers.

Another great formula to use is called AIDA, or Attention, Interest, Desire, Action.

With this technique, you do the following: Use the headline to get your prospect’s atttention. Then tell a story to generate interest. Next build desire for your services by painting a picture of success. Then describe in detail what you would like your prospcet to do next, or call her to action.

There are a number of great copywriting techniques that work well for construction letters. Now go out and try to get some new business with these techniques.

Here are some copywriting resources for you:

Copywriting

Bob Bly

Copywriter Nashville

 

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